Fire ‘involving URANIUM’ breaks out at Tennessee National Security Complex where America’s first atom bomb was developed, forcing evacuation of 200 staffers

Fire 'involving URANIUM' breaks 1

The Oak Ridge complex was home to the Manhattan Project for research and development during World War II An NNSA spokesperson confirmed that the fire started at 9.15am at the federal facility Authorities confirmed that the material involved in the fire was a metal compound of uranium.

EMMA JAMES

A fire ‘involving uranium’ broke out at a National Security Complex in Tennessee with all staff being evacuated from the site. The National Nuclear Security Administration said that an emergency response responded to the blaze on Wednesday morning at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge.

All of their 200 employees were accounted for, with other buildings next to the site being evacuated as a precaution. An NNSA spokesperson confirmed that the fire started at 9.15am at the federal facility, and the blaze was limited to the site itself.

They added: ‘Emergency Services responded to the event. The site activated the Y-12 Emergency Response Organization and we’ve been in close contact with local and state officials. ‘There are no reports of injury or contamination.’ But they confirmed that they would assess employees, if needed, following the incident.

Building 9212 is listed on the Department of Energy website as a uranium processing building, constructed in 1945. It serves ‘as one of the primary chemical processing and enriched uranium production facilities at Y-12. The Oak Ridge complex was home to the ═×anhattan Project for research and development during World War II, which produced the first nuclear weapons.

It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom and Canada. Authorities confirmed that the material involved in the fire was a metal compound of uranium. Congressional representatives were notified of the emergency as part of that response and were reportedly ‘comfortable’ with the response. Around 1pm, officials announced that the rest of the complex had returned to business as usual but did not confirm if the fire was out.

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